TG-1 * Transgallaxys Forum 1

Pages: [1]

Author Topic: Videospiele und Aggression bei Kindern  (Read 631 times)

wilma

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 32
Videospiele und Aggression bei Kindern
« on: March 05, 2010, 10:44:41 AM »

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100301111405.htm

[*QUOTE*]
--------------------
Violent Video Game Play Makes More Aggressive Kids, Study Shows

ScienceDaily (Mar. 2, 2010) — Iowa State University Distinguished Professor of Psychology Craig Anderson has made much of his life's work studying how violent video game play affects youth behavior. And he says a new study he led, analyzing 130 research reports on more than 130,000 subjects worldwide, proves conclusively that exposure to violent video games makes more aggressive, less caring kids -- regardless of their age, sex or culture.
...
---------------------
[*/QUOTE*]


Das Abstract der Studie:

Psychol Bull. 2010 Mar;136(2):151-73.
Violent video game effects on aggression, empathy, and prosocial behavior in Eastern and Western countries: A meta-analytic review.

Anderson CA, Shibuya A, Ihori N, Swing EL, Bushman BJ, Sakamoto A, Rothstein HR, Saleem M.

Center for the Study of Violence, Department of Psychology, Iowa State University.

Meta-analytic procedures were used to test the effects of violent video games on aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, aggressive affect, physiological arousal, empathy/desensitization, and prosocial behavior. Unique features of this meta-analytic review include (a) more restrictive methodological quality inclusion criteria than in past meta-analyses; (b) cross-cultural comparisons; (c) longitudinal studies for all outcomes except physiological arousal; (d) conservative statistical controls; (e) multiple moderator analyses; and (f) sensitivity analyses. Social-cognitive models and cultural differences between Japan and Western countries were used to generate theory-based predictions. Meta-analyses yielded significant effects for all 6 outcome variables. The pattern of results for different outcomes and research designs (experimental, cross-sectional, longitudinal) fit theoretical predictions well. The evidence strongly suggests that exposure to violent video games is a causal risk factor for increased aggressive behavior, aggressive cognition, and aggressive affect and for decreased empathy and prosocial behavior. Moderator analyses revealed significant research design effects, weak evidence of cultural differences in susceptibility and type of measurement effects, and no evidence of sex differences in susceptibility. Results of various sensitivity analyses revealed these effects to be robust, with little evidence of selection (publication) bias. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 20192553


Kurzzitat aus dem Volltext, quasi Einleitung zum Artikel:

[*QUOTE*]
---------------------
You know what’s really exciting about video games is you don’t just
interact with the game physically—you’re not just moving your hand
on a joystick, but you’re asked to interact with the game psychologically
and emotionally as well. You’re not just watching the characters
on screen; you’re becoming those characters.
—Nina Huntemann, Game Over
--------------------
[*/QUOTE*]


***********************************

Diskussionen zum oben genannten Artikel, in der gleichen Zeitschrift erschienen:

Psychol Bull. 2010 Mar;136(2):174-8.
Much ado about nothing: The misestimation and overinterpretation of violent video game effects in Eastern and Western nations: Comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

Ferguson CJ, Kilburn J.

Department of Behavioral, Applied Sciences and Criminal Justice, Texas A&M International University.

The issue of violent video game influences on youth violence and aggression remains intensely debated in the scholarly literature and among the general public. Several recent meta-analyses, examining outcome measures most closely related to serious aggressive acts, found little evidence for a relationship between violent video games and aggression or violence. In a new meta-analysis, C. A. Anderson et al. (2010) questioned these findings. However, their analysis has several methodological issues that limit the interpretability of their results. In their analysis, C. A. Anderson et al. included many studies that do not relate well to serious aggression, an apparently biased sample of unpublished studies, and a "best practices" analysis that appears unreliable and does not consider the impact of unstandardized aggression measures on the inflation of effect size estimates. They also focused on bivariate correlations rather than better controlled estimates of effects. Despite a number of methodological flaws that all appear likely to inflate effect size estimates, the final estimate of r = .15 is still indicative of only weak effects. Contrasts between the claims of C. A. Anderson et al. (2010) and real-world data on youth violence are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 20192554

***********************************

Psychol Bull. 2010 Mar;136(2):179-81.
Nailing the coffin shut on doubts that violent video games stimulate aggression: Comment on Anderson et al. (2010).

Huesmann LR.

University of Michigan.

Over the past half century the mass media, including video games, have become important socializers of children. Observational learning theory has evolved into social-cognitive information processing models that explain that what a child observes in any venue has both short-term and long-term influences on the child's behaviors and cognitions. C. A. Anderson et al.'s (2010) extensive meta-analysis of the effects of violent video games confirms what these theories predict and what prior research about other violent mass media has found: that violent video games stimulate aggression in the players in the short run and increase the risk for aggressive behaviors by the players later in life. The effects occur for males and females and for children growing up in Eastern or Western cultures. The effects are strongest for the best studies. Contrary to some critics' assertions, the meta-analysis of C. A. Anderson et al. is methodologically sound and comprehensive. Yet the results of meta-analyses are unlikely to change the critics' views or the public's perception that the issue is undecided because some studies have yielded null effects, because many people are concerned that the implications of the research threaten freedom of expression, and because many people have their identities or self-interests closely tied to violent video games. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

PMID: 20192555
Logged

ama

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 710
Re: Videospiele und Aggression bei Kindern
« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2013, 03:14:29 PM »

push!
Logged


Heaven can wait!
Pages: [1]